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  • Some Personal Branding Brain Food

    Recently, I stumbled across Tom Peters’ article The Brand Called You — I pulled out some of my favorite points for this week’s post. If you have not read this article yet, it is an non-negotiable, absolute, must-read! If you have read it, it won’t hurt to read it again — I learn something new everytime I do.

    Here are my favorite quotes:

    Regardless of age, regardless of position, regardless of the business we happen to be in, all of us need to understand the importance of branding. We are CEOs of our own companies: Me Inc. To be in business today, our most important job is to be head marketer for the brand called You.

    The real action is at the other end: the main chance is becoming a free agent in an economy of free agents, looking to have the best season you can imagine in your field, looking to do your best work and chalk up a remarkable track record, and looking to establish your own micro equivalent of the Nike swoosh. Because if you do, you’ll not only reach out toward every opportunity within arm’s (or laptop’s) length, you’ll not only make a noteworthy contribution to your team’s success — you’ll also put yourself in a great bargaining position for next season’s free-agency market.

    The second important thing to remember about your personal visibility campaign is: it all matters. When you’re promoting brand You, everything you do — and everything you choose not to do — communicates the value and character of the brand. Everything from the way you handle phone conversations to the email messages you send to the way you conduct business in a meeting is part of the larger message you’re sending about your brand.

    The key to any personal branding campaign is “word-of-mouth marketing.” Your network of friends, colleagues, clients, and customers is the most important marketing vehicle you’ve got; what they say about you and your contributions is what the market will ultimately gauge as the value of your brand. So the big trick to building your brand is to find ways to nurture your network of colleagues — consciously.

    I know this may sound like selfishness. But being CEO of Me Inc. requires you to act selfishly — to grow yourself, to promote yourself, to get the market to reward yourself. Of course, the other side of the selfish coin is that any company you work for ought to applaud every single one of the efforts you make to develop yourself. After all, everything you do to grow Me Inc. is gravy for them: the projects you lead, the networks you develop, the customers you delight, the braggables you create generate credit for the firm. As long as you’re learning, growing, building relationships, and delivering great results, it’s good for you and it’s great for the company.

    Instead of making yourself a slave to the concept of a career ladder, reinvent yourself on a semiregular basis. Start by writing your own mission statement, to guide you as CEO of Me Inc. What turns you on? Learning something new? Gaining recognition for your skills as a technical wizard? Shepherding new ideas from concept to market? What’s your personal definition of success? Money? Power? Fame? Or doing what you love? However you answer these questions, search relentlessly for job or project opportunities that fit your mission statement. And review that mission statement every six months to make sure you still believe what you wrote.

    No matter what you’re doing today, there are four things you’ve got to measure yourself against. First, you’ve got to be a great teammate and a supportive colleague. Second, you’ve got to be an exceptional expert at something that has real value. Third, you’ve got to be a broad-gauged visionary — a leader, a teacher, a farsighted “imagineer.” Fourth, you’ve got to be a businessperson — you’ve got to be obsessed with pragmatic outcomes.

    This is absolutely fantastic stuff — I get so pumped up every time I read Tom Peters’ article: The Brand Called You.

    What do you think of these quotes? Leave your comments below.

    Author:

    Chad Levitt is the author of the New Sales Economy blog, which focuses on how Sales 2.0 & Social Media can help you connect, create more opportunities and increase your business. Chad is also the featured Sales 2.0 blogger at SalesGravy.com, the number one web portal for sales pros, the professional athletes of the business world. Make sure to connect with him on Twitter @chadalevitt.

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    Chad Levitt is the author of the New Sales Economy blog, which focuses on how Sales 2.0 & Social Media can help you connect, create more opportunities and increase your business. Chad is also the featured Sales 2.0 blogger at SalesGravy.com, the number one web portal for sales pros, the professional athletes of the business world. During the day, Chad is an inside sales associate with EMC Corp., the global leader in information infrastructure technology & solutions, in their award winning sales development program. Chad attended the University of Central Florida for his undergraduate degree and Nova Southeastern University for his MBA with a concentration in finance.

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    Posted in Articles, Brand Yourself As, Personal Branding, Success Strategies
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    2 comments on “Some Personal Branding Brain Food
    1. avatar
      EXPERT
      Chad Levitt says:

      Hi everyone! I’m not sure why the links to Tom Peters’ article aren’t live in the post. Here is the link for you all to read the full text.

      http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/10/brandyou.html

    2. avatar
      EXPERT
      Pete Kistler says:

      Chad,

      Thanks for taking the time to capture these gems from Tom Peters’ original and inspiring article on personal branding.

      – Pete Kistler
      CEO, Brand-Yourself.com

    2 Pings/Trackbacks for "Some Personal Branding Brain Food"
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