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  • HOW TO: Write Your 60-Second Elevator Pitch

    Everyone (myself included) is telling you to go out there and network. But, what do you plan to say to people while you’re networking? (For the uninitiated, networking is not merely retaining as many business cards as possible from other people in the span of an hour.)

    Who are you?

    This is the first question you should ask yourself when constructing your elevator pitch. My answer might look a bit like the bio at the end of this piece.

    What are you seeking?

    Is your end goal to land a job or a client? After you’ve explained to your new networking contact who you are, it’s important to communicate what you’re seeking.

    What can you offer?

    It’s not enough to be looking for a job, client, etc. You have to offer something of value in return. This is often called your unique selling proposition (USP).

    Request action

    Sure, you said what you’re seeking, but you should be explicit with your networking contact about the next step in this new relationship.

    Putting it together

    To borrow from a great book you should pick up and read immediately, Tell Me About Yourself: Storytelling to Get Jobs and Propel Your Career by Katharine Hansen, a college student or recent graduate might follow this basic structure:

    Hi, my name is ______________. I will be graduating/I just graduated from ______________ with a degree in ______________. I’m looking to ______________. I recently ______________. Can I take you out for coffee sometime to elicit your advice?

    K.I.S.S.

    Keep it simple and short. Your elevator pitch should be no longer than 60 seconds. After all, (1) you don’t want to bore the other individual and (2) you want to hear his/her story, too! Networking is a two-way, mutually beneficial relationship.

    What is your example of a successful elevator pitch?

    Author:

    Heather R. Huhman is a career expert and founder & president of Come Recommended, an exclusive online community connecting the best internship and entry-level job candidates with the best employers. She is also the author of #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), national entry-level careers columnist for Examiner.com and blogs about career advice at HeatherHuhman.com.

    avatar

    Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.

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    5 comments on “HOW TO: Write Your 60-Second Elevator Pitch
    1. avatar
      EXPERT

      Great post, Heather! I just posted my example of my own elevator pitch in my personal branding blog. http://czarinatrinidadatwork.blogspot.com/.

    2. avatar
      EXPERT
      Dave Felton says:

      Nice, simple advice. I am normally a shy person and self promotion doesn’t come easy. Thanks for the article.

    3. avatar
      EXPERT

      Yes, a great advice and most important to keep it short and simple.
      More like a short ‘about ME’ introduction than an elevator pitch.

    4. avatar
      EXPERT

      Here’s my current elevator pitch…. it’s always under revision as I develop.

      I’m Elizabeth Campbell Duke, principal and owner of CampbellDuke Personal Branding. I’m looking for job hunters, career changers and solopreneurs who are willing to create a personal brand that will make them stand out in their communities. I offer tools and resources that proactive, positive people need to develop and maintain their personal brand throughout the course of their careers. Clients can access my services through personal consultations, corporate workshops or at speaking events. You can learn more about me and my work by subscribing to my blog, newsletter or podcasts or by connecting on Facebook or Linked In. Here’s my card!

    5. avatar
      EXPERT

      You raise a lot of questions in my head; you wrote a good post, but this post is also thought provoking, and I will have to ponder it some more; I will be back soon. At least this makes some kind of crazy sense; but why would they deny you anything if you have acne, or varicose veins? And oh, don’t forget that if you happen to be a minor or an athlete or an oil driller working offshore, you had better keep walking.

    12 Pings/Trackbacks for "HOW TO: Write Your 60-Second Elevator Pitch"
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    2. […] How to write your 60-second elevator pitch. […]

    3. […] to Heather R. Huhman on this site, the steps […]

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    11. […] movies, or books. Making small talk comes more naturally when you find common ground. Or, prepare a 60-second elevator pitch as a quick way to forge […]

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